Come stand by me…

I was walking through the streets of Leicester, wearing a mask and trying to be normal, it felt; Surreal.

I realise there’s other people like me, with the routines I have, and the cloudy days within!

People belittle me (Mapplethorpe, Woodman, Tillman) – JUST LET ME BE!

You know I’m an open vessel, just fill me up and know, that I know.

I wonder if you really know what it feels like when you’re empty (or thirsty) inside? (We should know how it feels because that’s how we feel!) – Like isolation and cold. (And only from the inside)!

If you can’t, you will – just give it time!

Until recently, I’ve felt abandoned within (and from everyone) including you! Just ask me questions then let me be (And stop stalking me)!

But you know what? it doesn’t even matter because I know,..

I KNOW!

I’m abandoned.

And that helps me stay tuned, – I’m alone, and I can only be myself as I’m marooned.

So I see someone ask for help; I wonder, do *you* know how it feels? (When you’re lonely and you can’t turn to anyone and it feels lonely within)

You feel like a stranger, an invisible skin. (And you know how it feels within)! You’re not sure and you feel empty, inside?

Come stand by me, side by side.

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The Reaper

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As I slept that night I had no idea The Reaper was in my house. I remember locking the doors and windows so I don’t know how he got in. Maybe he slipped through while I wasn’t looking. At this stage of my life, I didn’t believe in Reaper’s so it didn’t occur to me to check if we had one in the house.

So I lay asleep that night, cosy and comfortable in my bed, blissfully unaware there was a Reaper in my home and completely unaware that I had seen my father for the last time.

Dawn breaks.

Several days and nights come and go but I don’t remember them. I can’t remember much of what happened, I will not remember, I don’t remember, I do not want to remember what happened.

So it’s just me now, a wreckage in the modern world. Every and every morning begins with the realisation that he’s gone.

Forever.

He’ll never be there to watch me become the man I’ll eventually become. He’ll never know me, who I’ll be after I’ve finished growing up.

I’m supposed to say goodbye.

How do you say goodbye?

Do I hold his hands? Do I cuddle him? Do I sit with him and drink a cup of tea? Do I say everything I never did but always wanted to? Do I tell him I love him and I want him back or do I say nothing?

If I never say goodbye, he can’t really be gone.

The Reaper made a mistake.

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A Decisive Moment

A Decisive Moment
Everything I’ve lost
Everyone I’ve hurt
All the times I lied
All the moments wasted
All the things I’ve done
All the people I wronged
All the times I hushed
All the moments wasted
All I never changed
All the dreams I had
All the things I could change
I would change them
I would make right what I’ve done wrong
I’d change how the future becomes
I’d take hold of my enemies, love their obscenities
I’d kiss them, (then leave them like lovers who’ve gone)
And now the moment has come…

Friday Street

In 2008, Tate Modern opened the world’s first major public museum display of graffiti and street art, inviting six international artists to decorate its facade with enormous, eye-catching murals.

Laptop SkinMeanwhile, just down the riverbank at Southwark crown court, eight members of London’s well-known DPM crew were tried for an estimated £1m in graffiti-related damages across the country, and sentenced to a total of 11 years in prison – the biggest prosecution for graffiti that the UK has ever seen.

The Anti-Social Behaviour Act defines graffiti as “painting, writing, soiling, marking or other defacing by whatever means”. Anything from a quickly executed “tag” to a detailed mural could be deemed illegal, and the artist subject to a £5,000 fine or prosecution. Despite this clear-cut definition, there are double standards in the way graffiti is perceived, and the law creates pockets of permission for some artists while penalising others.

DrawString Bag

Ban it, legalise it or put it behind glass! No matter what city councils or the police do, graffiti remains the scapegoat for all manner of urban ills, from burglary on one extreme to gentrification on the other. There are, however a large majority of us who enjoy bringing the outside home, to decorate our own walls with artistry from the streets.

Presenting ‘Friday Street’notebook

‘Friday Street’ is a collection of urban art from the youth of Leicester. Friday Street is situated on a semi-abandoned Jitty close to the Centre of Leicester. The area has seen multiple arson attacks, gang violence and street robbery. Yet Friday Street itself is an entrance to a beautiful public park, which attracts thousands of visitors on a regular basis.

Legal or not, as graffiti seeps into the fabric of our neighbourhoods, it becomes a natural fact of everyday life, a cultural practice appreciated and legitimised by young urban dwellers.

This “gentrification graffiti” is representative of the cycle of transformation in cities across the world, whereby artists are caught up in contributing to their own displacement.

What might you discover on Friday Street? – Click here to find out!

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Photographs from Leicester Pride 2017

Leicester Pride is attended by more 10,000 people each year with more than 2,000 taking part in the parade through the city, starting at The Curve and ending at Victoria Park.  Leicester Pride celebrates equality and diversity in our community and is a family event with entertainment and attractions suitable for all ages.

Leicester Pride began in 2001 after being awarded a successful bid of £5000 to involve the lesbian and gay community in the production of a Leicester Pride Carnival, to involve the whole community in the carnival itself and to promote better understanding. It was supported by Arts Council England.

There had been major concerns that Pride 2017 which has grown to celebrate and promote the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community in the city and county, would have to be cancelled for due to a lack of funds.

Pride’s troubles were spotted in the media by a DMU student who involved the Student Union Vice-Chancellor Professor Dominic Shellard.  #DMUlocal stepped in with £10,000 to help make a difference within the Leicester community.

Here’s some photographs of the day, can you pick yourself out?

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The problem with Ren Hang’s book

The problem with Ren Hang’s latest book, is that it’s so good! – It’s almost exclusively photographs and are the last set authorized by Ren Hang himself.  There will never be any more in this vein.  I’ve only sampled a few pages because when I get to the end, it’s the end.

So I read with caution and I promise not to ‘over excite’ myself with new material. I will learn to read with antici…

…pation and view just a few pages every and now and then and appreciate his work for longer.

Visit his website, (http://renhang.org) put his name in every search engine you come across and don’t forget to look at his beautiful, playful and innocent yet evocative, constructed and dirty photographs.

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Full Length Photography Documentaries

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There are plenty of photography documentaries available online which span different genres, period in time and subject and I enjoy it when I find relevant, feature length and interesting films, which help to educate as a change from books or blogs.

When I’ve finished watching a documentary I’ve particularly enjoyed, I’ll update this post with a link to the video. (There’s a twitter thread too). As of 28th August there’s 15 videos around 10 hours.

If you know people who aren’t into photography as much you are, and would like to introduce them to your passion, you could send them your favourite from this list as an introduction to the Photograph as Art.

Born from Science and Art, what follows are stories of imagination, of playing with light and technology or changing worlds and societies. Without photographs, would we see the struggles of marginalized people, perceived by the general populace as ugly, outcast or irrelevant?

Without photography, how would we illustrate issues around death, sex, mental health, drugs, sexuality and abuse?

Do you simply enjoy pictures or are you intrigued at, or maybe excited at the reasons behind why people are compelled to create and share photographs? Are you genuinely interested and surprised with other peoples work?

We take photographs, we read about photographs, we read about people taking and reading about photographs and we want to know and understand more about photographs. How very meta.

Take some time out from your reading, delve into these documentaries instead. These videos highlight our interest, demonstrate why we enjoy what we do, explores the craftsmanship of some of the great photographers while showing how diverse our photography community is.

What’s missing? Do you have a favourite? Is it online? – Why should we watch it? – Please let us know!

Ren Hang: The Art of Taboo

Gregory Crewdson’s Photography Capturing a Movie Frame

William Eggleston Documentary: In The Real World

The Many Lives of William Klein (2012)

Joel Meyerowitz 1981 Street Photography

“Reely and Truly” – A Film By Tyrone Lebon

A Day in The Life of Andy Warhol

Robert Mapplethorpe

Vile Bodies Part 1 – Naked

The Wizard of Photography (George Eastman ‘the Man who created Kodak’ documentary). Part 1 below, be sure to watch Part 2 and Part 3

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Without My Eye

Without The Eye

Without my eye I’m in the gutter
And without my mind I cannot see
Pick up the lens and press the shutter
Shoot what I love, what I perceive

Without the heart there is no story
And without the story I’m horrified
My imagination, my laboratory
Then work it over, ’till I’m satisfied

Before I came, I was nothing
And without production I can’t live
I show the world I amount to something
This is my work, my narrative

I’ve woken up, I’m here forever
And I do these cycles all the time
Explained for you, it’s for my pleasure
That’s why I wrote this dirty rhyme!

Why do you even try to stop me?
From doing things I need to do?
Get out the way of this tsunami
And give me credit when its due

Every one of my creations
They are something to behold
No fears or doubts, nor hesitations
I’m breaking through my threshold.

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Why Photography?

Road to nowhere
Road to Nowhere by Tom Robson

Entitled ‘My Life Is About To Change‘ the last meaningful article here is over 5 months ago.  It’s an excitable announcement that I’m going to university to study Photography & Video suggesting I was about to start sharing ideas, work and articles as I begin my degree.

Like many people, I get lazy.  I read about photography, I generate ideas for my own photo projects and I’m excited that I’m starting university soon. In the past 5 months though, when it comes to actually taking photographs or conducting research, or writing about photography, I’m not so good.  I’m not particularly skilled at writing, (in fact, I’m having an assessment soon to determine if I’m dyslexic) which is why I need to do this more and do it online in the open.

I’d love to promise a worthwhile and meaningful photo essay once a week, I’d love to share every useful and decent article or book I read.  I’d love to write more and share my research.  I want to do these things, but I’m no good at the process or routine of it – it doesn’t make any sense, does it? – All of this will become automatic in a couple of months, so I’m trying to give myself a head start, share more and try to do this more regularly.

Where do I start? – I guess the most obvious question is…

Why Photography?

Photography isn’t about holding a camera, taking a picture and sharing photos, that’s what we all do every day with our smartphones.  Most of us today assume the the purpose of taking photos is to share them on social media, whether or not they are faked selfies or emotional acts of expression.  For the most part, the cameras which most of us carry every day are used to take photographs.  But there is more to photography that this, we create photographs.

This is an important distinction because photographs are created for different purposes, they are created for art, for documentary reasons, for memories, for sharing on social media, to sell products, to take photographs of dead babies, the list goes on and on.

What is always evident is that photographs are created for a reason and I’m interested in the reasons behind the photographs.  This is why I can look at photographs of tower blocks or people pushed up against windows as works of art.

Maternal Line

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Olive Cotton 2017 winning work: Maternal Line by Justine Varga.

Justine Varga caused outrage when she won $20,000 in a portraiture competition with her work ‘Maternal Line’.  In her photograph, she captures her grandmother’s portrait.

The controversy appears to stem from people being offended that her portrait did not conform to their idea of what a portrait is.  Photography is subjective, it can mean different things to people.

A photographic portrait isn’t necessarily the image of a person.  Isn’t it better when the photograph is a real portrayal of the person? – Anyone can snap a photo, some people take great shots, others take great portraits while some really think about how to portray an individual using photographic technology.

People are upset because they were expecting the winning photograph to be an image of a person, they may look at Varga’s work and say “my 4 year could have done that” but you know what, your 4 year old didn’t, and neither did you!

As Justine Varga’s grandmother was testing pens on a sheet of paper, she noticed the action and wanted to ‘capture’ a portrait of her Gran doing this.  With so many photographs (or portraits) already, she decided to explore and capture the essence of her Gran, rather than a traditional photograph.  She asked her grandmother to test her pens on a 4×5 negative and after it was developed, you see her scribes, her movements, an imprint of her hand and even some saliva stains.

  • Is it a photo? Yes, a negative film with an imprint was developed and printed in colour.
  • Is it a portrayal of someone? Yes, there is a likeness of someone together with evidence of their DNA.
  • Is it a traditional portrait? No, it violates everything we have come to expect from traditional portraiture photography.

By these definitions, Maternal Line is a portrait of Justine Varga’s grandmother.  The sense of a traditional portrait is replaced by a different sense of a portrait, that doesn’t make it any less of a portrait.  Instead, the photograph has pushed the boundary between what is ordinary and what is unexpected, it has made people talk about what a photograph is and further advances Photography as Art (whether people like it or not)!

Found

Aside from Photography as Art, (or any visual representation) the nature of photography is interesting and in this example we can explore the connections between different acts of picture making and how we are connected to it at all times.

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Excerpt from Found by Carlos Pacheco.

In Carlos Pacheco’s ‘Found’ project, photographs found online are matched with CCTV footage of the same time and location which provide an additional recording of the moment the original photograph was taken.  What I find interesting in Pancheco’s example is that people are taking photographs for their own purposes and at some point in the future, a visual artist is linking the CCTV footage to the snapshot.  You have seen a further copy of the original photograph here and you are now, forever connected to the girl on the road.  Work begets work, art begets art, how very meta.

An hour of footage is removed every hour from the Abbey Road CCTV Camera, there is a time limit to how many images can be found and displayed in this manner.  Once the photograph and footage are linked together, a new record is created of the event, stored on a different server before the footage is deleted forever.  Adding to, and extending the life of the original footage.  Big Brother is watching you, but you may not realize that photographers and artists are using the data to create new things.

 

Heather Whitten

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Photograph by Heather Whitten

The mininterpretation (or subjectivity) of photography is another reason why I enjoy the genre.  In November 2014, Photographer Heather Whitten posted a picture to Facebook of a naked child cradled in the lap of a naked man.  It caused controversy, some people saw nude images between children and adults as offensive and others saw a beautiful bond between a sick child and his father.  Facebook even removed the photograph because it didn’t meet the ‘expected standards’

She has also been investigated for child neglect because an online user reported her to local authorities.  Read the full story here and here and here, I don’t believe you’ll find any reason for her to be charged for child neglect.

Other interesting reasons for enjoying photography is understanding where it came from, how it’s impacted our world and what it might be capable of in the future.

This is why I enjoy photography, it’s why I believe there is no such thing as a bad photograph and I hope my own photographic work will transcend what is deemed acceptable by other people’s definitions of the genre.

What does photography mean to you? – Why do you like it? What is the best example of your reasons?

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